Tag Archives: Hall of Fame

MLB Hot Stove: Brewers add to the outfield, Hall of Fame announces ’18 class

The slow offseason news cycle picked up a bit this week, starting with the announcement of the 2018 Hall of Fame class on Wednesday. But the bigger news as it relates to on-field moves came on Thursday, when the Brewers added to the outfield via a trade and the biggest free-agent signing to this point of the hot stove season.

The trade was announced first, with the Brewers acquiring OF Christian Yelich from the Marlins — who continue to trade their stars as they begin what looks to be a lengthy rebuilding process — in exchange for a package of four prospects led by OF Lewis Brinson. Also going to Miami in the deal are OF Monte Harrison, IF Isan Diaz and P Jordan Yamamoto. Shortly after that trade was announced, the Brewers announced the signing of OF Lorenzo Cain to a five-year, $80 million contract.

In Yelich, the Brewers get a 26-year-old who is a career .290 hitter in five MLB seasons. He has started to show some power in the last couple of seasons, hitting 21 home runs in 2016 and 18 homers last season. He’s also had double-digit steals in four of his five seasons and has steadily increased his walk totals over the last three seasons. Yelich was expected to be traded by the Marlins after he and his agent have publicly shown his displeasure for the Marlins’ trading teammates Giancarlo Stanton, Dee Gordon and Marcell Ozuna earlier in the offseason. Yelich is under team control through 2021, with a team option for the 2022 season.

Cain is the first player this offseason to sign a contract of longer than three years. Signing with the Brewers is a homecoming for the former All-Star, who was drafted by the Brewers and played his rookie season there before being traded to the Royals in December 2010. He spent the last seven season with the Royals, with whom he was part of the team that won the 2015 World Series. He is also a .290 career hitter but doesn’t have much power, hitting a total of 57 home runs in his eight seasons. He does have speed, though, averaging nearly 16 steals per season, with 26 last season. He made the American League All-Star team in 2015, when his career year — .307 average, 16 HR, 72 RBI, 28 steals — helped him finish in third place in AL MVP voting.

With these additions, the Brewers’ regular outfield will likely consist of Yelich in right field, Cain in center and Ryan Braun in left field. The acquisitions also give the Brewers depth in the outfield, allowing them to potentially use someone like Domingo Santana or Brett Phillips as trade bait to try to add to the starting rotation, which is the weak spot on the team as it stands. The Brewers were already an 86-win team in 2017 and finished just a game out of the playoffs and look to improve upon that record with these moves, which give them a bump on offense.

Other deals that have been made in the last couple weeks include the Blue Jays trading a couple minor league pitchers to the Cardinals for OF Randal Grichuk and signing OF Curtis Granderson, the Cubs signing P Brian Duensing, the Giants inking OF Austin Jackson and the Mets re-signing SS Jose Reyes. That leaves names like pitchers Yu Darvish and Jake Arrieta, along with hitters such as J.D. Martinez, Mike Moustakas and Eric Hosmer remaining in free agency.

The other big news of the week was the announcement of the 2018 Hall of Fame class. The BBWAA voters elected four members to the Hall — 3B Chipper Jones, 1B/DH Jim Thome, OF Vladimir Guerrero and RP Trevor Hoffman. They join P Jack Morris and SS Alan Trammell, who were elected to the Hall of Fame by the Modern Baseball Committee in December. Jones and Thome were in their first year of eligibility on the ballot, while Guerrero was in his second year and Hoffman his third.

Jones spent his entire 19-year career with the Braves, finishing his career with a .303 average, 468 home runs and 1,623 RBI. He was an eight-time All-Star and a member of the Braves team that won the 1995 World Series. He was named the National League MVP in 1999. He earned 97.2% of the vote.

Thome spent 13 of his 22 seasons with the Indians. He played more than 2500 games in his career, swatting 612 home runs to go along with a .276 career average and 1,699 RBI. He was a five-time All-Star who finished fourth in NL MVP voting in 2003 (with the Phillies). He earned 89.8% of the vote.

Guerrero played 16 seasons, spending the majority of his career with the Expos (eight seasons) and Angels (six seasons). He hit .318 in his career with 449 home runs and 1,496 RBI. He was elected to nine All-Star teams and won the AL MVP in 2004, his first season with the Angels. He earned 92.9% of the vote, a significant jump from the 71.7% he got his first time on the ballot in 2017. He has announced that he will go into the Hall of Fame as an Angel, becoming the first inductee to represent that team in the Hall.

Hoffman spent 16 of his 18 seasons on the Padres, amassing a then-record 601 saves by the time he retired in 2010. In 1,035 appearances, he threw 1,089.1 innings, with a 2.87 ERA and 1,133 strikeouts with a 61-75 record. He was named to seven All-Star teams and finished in the top 10 in NL MVP voting in 1998 and 2006. He earned 79.9% of the vote.

Just missing election was DH Edgar Martinez, who got 70.4% of the vote, falling a few votes shy of the 75% needed. That means he likely has a good chance to get elected next year in what will be his 10th and final year on the BBWAA ballot. Also on next year’s ballot will be a list of first-timers that includes RP Mariano Rivera (who surpassed Hoffman’s saves record), 1B/OF Lance Berkman, 1B Todd Helton, OF Juan Pierre, and SPs Andy Pettitte, Roy Oswalt and the late Roy Halladay.

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The 2017 Baseball Hall of Fame class: Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, Ivan Rodriguez

Due to a rule change several years ago, a player only has 10 years on the writers’ ballot to be voted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame before having to wait to potentially get inducted by the veterans’ committee. Since this was LF Tim Raines’ final year on the ballot, it was a make-or-break election for him. With 86% of the 442 ballots cast — well over the 75% needed — Raines was finally elected in the Hall of Fame this year with 380 votes. Also voted in by the writers this week are 1B Jeff Bagwell — who led all candidates with 86.2% of the vote, with his 381 votes edging Raines by one — and C Ivan Rodriguez, who netted 76% (336 votes) in his first year of eligibility. P Trevor Hoffman and RF Vladimir Guerrero fell just short of election, with 74% and 71.7% respectively. With those numbers, both are virtual locks to be elected in 2018. For comparison, Bagwell garnered 71.6% of the vote last year before vaulting up nearly 15% this year and Raines had 69.8% in 2016.

Jeff Bagwell spent his entire 15-year MLB career with the Astros after being traded to Houston in 1990 (for veteran P Larry Andersen) as a minor-leaguer while he was in the Red Sox organization. He earned National League Rookie of the Year honors in 1991 with a .294 batting average, 15 home runs and 82 RBI in 156 games. That marked the lowest full-season home-run total of his career as his power numbers increased throughout his time in the league, peaking at a career-high 47 home runs in 2000. He was voted NL MVP in the strike-shortened 1994 season, when he hit a career-best .368 with 39 home runs and a career-high 116 RBI in 400 at-bats over 110 games. His 116 RBI and 104 runs scored both led the National League that season. He was named to the NL All-Star team in 1994, 1996, 1997 and 1999. Although he continued to put up decent home-run totals, his batting average started to decrease starting in 2001 as he started dealing with an arthritic right shoulder that eventually ended his career following the 2005 season.

Bagwell wasn’t just a power hitter — he could also steal bases, entering the 30-30 club in ’97, when he swiped a career-high 31 bases, and ’99. With 43 and 42 home runs, respectively, those years he actually was in even more rarified air in the 40-30 club. When his career ended, he had a .297 average and set Astros records with 449 home runs and 1,529 RBI in 2,150 regular-season games. He also had 202 steals and 1,401 walks by the time he called it a career. Before he hung up the cleats for good, though, he finally got to play in a World Series, playing in all four games of the Fall Classic when the White Sox swept the Astros.

Other honors Bagwell received during his career include a Gold Glove in ’94 and Silver Slugger awards in ’94, ’97 and ’99.

Tim Raines is most often associated with the Expos, with whom he spent the first 12 seasons of his career. He later spent five seasons with the White Sox, three with the Yankees and one in Oakland. After taking a year off in 2000, he returned in 2001, spending time with the Expos and Orioles (for four games) before joining the Marlins for his final season in 2002. He is known as a base-stealer, and for good reason; he is the most successful base-stealer — by percentage — in MLB history (min. 400 steals). He didn’t waste any time showing off his speed, notching 71 steals in his first full season of 1981, being caught just 11 times. He led the National League in steals for four straight seasons, from 1981-84, with a career-high 90 steals in 1983. He made the NL All-Star team in each of his first seven full seasons from 1981-87. His best offensive season came in 1986 when he led the NL with a .334 average and .413 OBP. The height of his power came the following year, when he swatted 18 home runs.

Raines earned a World Series ring in 1996, when he was part of the Yankees team that swept the Braves in the Fall Classic, the only time in his career that Raines made it to the World Series. He won a Silver Slugger award in 1986.

Ivan “Pudge” Rodriguez is a rare catcher who excelled both at the plate and behind the plate. Rodriguez spent most of his 21-year career with the Rangers, also playing for the Marlins, Tigers, Yankees, Astros and Nationals for various lengths of time. Of the 2,543 games he played in his career, 2,427 were as a catcher — the most games behind the plate of any player in major-league history. His 14 all-star selections (1992-2001, 2004-07) and 13 Gold Gloves (1992-2001, 2004, 2006-07) also are the most all-time for the position.

Rodriguez was voted American League MVP in 1999, the best offensive season of his career when he hit .332 with 35 home runs, drove in 113 RBI and stole 25 bases. His 199 hits fell just shy of the 200-hit milestone. Defensively that season, he threw out 55% of potential base-stealers — that number topped the majors, one of nine seasons in which he led the majors in caught-stealing percentage. His best season in that category came in 2001, when he threw out 60% of runners who tried to steal a base against him. Back to the offense, he finished his career with 2,844 hits, which is the most in history for a major-leaguer who played at least 50% of his games as a catcher. HIs career batting average is .296, with 311 home runs and 1,332 RBI. He also stole 127 bases, which puts him near the top of the career list among catchers.

Rodriguez played in two World Series — winning it in 2003, his only season with the Marlins when they beat the Yankees in six games, and making it there again in 2006 with the Tigers, who lost to the Cardinals in five games. In addition to his MVP and 13 Gold Glove awards, Pudge won seven Silver Slugger awards (1994-99, 2004).

Also being inducted this year, who were voted in by the Today’s Game Era committee, are former team executive John Schuerholz and former commissioner and Brewers owner Bud Selig.

Percentages for other notable players on this year’s ballot include: DH Edgar Martinez, 58.6%; P Roger Clemens, 54.1%; LF Barry Bonds, 53.8%; P Mike Mussina, 51.8%; P Curt Schilling, 45.0%; OF Manny Ramirez, 23.8%

Players set to appear on the ballot for the first time in 2017 include P Chris Carpenter, OF Johnny Damon, P Livan Hernandez, CF Andruw Jones, 3B Chipper Jones, P Brad Lidge, OF Hideki Matsui, P Jamie Moyer, 3B Scott Rolen, P Johan Santana, 1B/DH Jim Thome and SS Omar Vizquel.

The 2017 National Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony is scheduled for July 30 in Cooperstown, N.Y.

Ken Griffey Jr., Mike Piazza Elected to Baseball Hall of Fame

The results of voting for the 2016 class of the National Baseball Hall of Fame were announced tonight, with CF Ken Griffey Jr. and C Mike Piazza receiving more than the 75% of votes needed for induction. There were 440 ballots cast — more than 100 fewer than last year after many inactive writers had their votes taken away — and 437 voted for Griffey, giving him a record-setting 99.3% of the vote in his first year of eligibility. In his fourth year on the ballot, Piazza was named on 365 writers’ ballots, giving him 83%.

Griffey finished his career with 630 home runs, currently sixth on the all-time list, in 22 seasons with the Mariners, Reds and White Sox. The .284 career hitter was a 13-time All-Star who won 10 Gold Gloves in his career and was named the American League MVP in 1997, when he hit 56 home runs and 147 RBI, both career highs for the second-generation major leaguer. If he goes into the Hall with a Mariners hat on his plaque, he would be the first player representing that team in the Hall of Fame.

Piazza is one of the top-hitting catchers in baseball history. In his 16-year career, he hit .308 with 427 home runs — a record 396 of which were hit as a catcher. The 1993 National League Rookie of the Year was selected to the All-Star team 12 times and won 10 Silver Slugger awards at catcher. Piazza played for five teams in his career, most notably the Dodgers and Mets; he is expected to have a Mets hat on his Hall of Fame plaque.

Just missing the cut this year were 1B Jeff Bagwell and OF Tim Raines, who got 71.6% and 69.8 percent of the vote, respectively. Bagwell has four years left on the ballot, but Raines was on the ballot for the ninth year, meaning 2017 will be his last chance at being elected by the Baseball Writers Association of America. If history is any indication, both have a good chance of getting elected last year; 16 of 17 players who got 70% of the vote, but less than 75%, were inducted the following year. P Trevor Hoffman had a good showing in his first year of eligibility, earning 67.3% of the vote. On the other end of the spectrum, 1B Mark McGwire got just 12% of the vote in his 10th and final year on the ballot.

Percentages for other notable players include: P Curt Schilling, 52.3%; P Roger Clemens, 45.2%; LF Barry Bonds, 44.3%.

Players set to appear on the ballot for the first time in 2017 include OF Vladimir Guerrero, C Jorge Posada, OF Manny Ramirez and C Ivan Rodriguez.

The 2016 National Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony is scheduled for July 24 in Cooperstown, N.Y.