Tag Archives: Indians

4th Annual 30 in 30ish MLB Previews: Minnesota Twins

The final AL Central team we preview in our monthlong series looking at all 30 MLB teams leading up to the start of the 2018 season is the Minnesota Twins, who came in second place in the division last season.

The Twins were a surprising team last year, winning 85 games and getting an American League Wild Card after losing 103 games in 2016. And they made a number of moves this winter to improve the team, including most recently signing SP Lance Lynn. Earlier in the offseason, they traded for SP Jake Odorizzi and signed DH Logan Morrison and RPs Addison Reed and Fernando Rodney. They also signed SP Michael PIneda to a two-year deal, but that is a signing geared toward 2019 as he will miss most — if not all — of this season as he recovers from the Tommy John surgery he had in July. 1B Joe Mauer returns as the veteran leader in his 15th season with the team.

The Twins hit .260 last season, which placed them in the top 10 in Major League Baseball, but their 206 home runs were middle-of-the-pack, and their .768 OPS was in the top half of the league. 2B Brian Dozier hit .271 with 34 home runs and an .856 OPS. 3B Miguel Sano hit .264 with 28 home runs in 114 games, and OF Eddie Rosario added 27 homers with a .290 average. OF Byron Buxton hit 16 home runs and stole 29 bases. Mauer hit .305 with 7 home runs. OF Max Kepler had 19 long balls. Morrison hit a career-best 38 home runs with the Rays, with a .246 average.

On the mound, the Twins’ 4.59 ERA put them in the bottom half of the league and their 1,166 strikeouts were the second-fewest in the majors. The bullpen recorded 42 games, which was above the league average. SP Ervin Santana posted a 3.28 ERA with 167 strikeouts in 211.1 innings over 33 starts last season. SP Jose Berrios posted a 3.89 ERA in 26 games — 25 starts — and struck out 139 in 145.2 innings, and SP Kyle Gibson struggled with a 5.07 ERA and 121 strikeouts in 158 innings over 29 starts. Odorizzi put up a 4.14 ERA in 28 starts with the Rays; he had 127 strikeouts in 143.1 innings. Lynn posted a respectable 3.43 ERA with the Cardinals, striking out 153 batters in 186.1 innings over 33 starts. Rodney recorded 39 saves with the Diamondbacks last season and put up a 4.23 ERA while striking out 65 in 55.1 innings, and Reed posted a 2.84 ERA with 19 saves for the Mets and Red Sox; he also had 76 strikeouts in 76 innings.

The Twins’ hitting was fine last season, and adding Morrison will provide a boost if he can even come close to the power he showed last season. it’s a largely young offense, which offers room for improvement if they can take their games to the next level. Signing Lynn and trading for Odorizzi provides needed depth in the rotation with Satana sidelined for up to 12 weeks with a finger injury, potentially leaving him out of action until May. Rodney is expected to begin the season as closer, but Reed could step into the ninth-inning role if Rodney struggles.

The Twins added to the team, trying to fill some holes they had last season, but the additions probably aren’t enough for the Twins to overtake the Indians as the best team in the division. They’ll certainly compete again for one of the Wild Cards in the AL, and I think they’ll get it, but if they do I’m not sure they’re good enough for a deep postseason run.

Be sure to check back every day around 12pm Eastern for another team preview, see them all here, and follow me on Twitter for a link to each new post when it’s posted.

Source: http://www.mntwins.comhttp://www.baseball-reference.com

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4th Annual 30 in 30ish MLB Previews: Kansas City Royals

The next AL Central team in our monthlong series previewing all 30 MLB teams leading up to the start of the 2018 season is the Kansas City Royals, who came in third place in the division last season.

Since winning the World Series in 2015, the Royals have won 80 and 81 games, respectively, the last two seasons. They’re looking to get back to where they were in that championship year, and perhaps the move they made this winter that will best help them achieve that goal was re-signing 3B Mike Moustakas, who didn’t have the free-agent market that he expected. They also signed OF Jon Jay and 1B Lucas Duda. They traded for SP Jesse Hahn but subsequently placed him on the 60-day DL with a UCL strain, which could lead to Tommy John surgery. Also unavailable for a while will be OF Jorge Bonifacio, who has been suspended 80 games for testing positive for a PED. They lost longtime 1B Eric Hosmer and OF Lorenzo Cain in free agency.

The Royals were in the top half of Major League Baseball with a .259 average last season while their 193 home runs were below the league average; their .731 OPS placed them in the bottom 10 in the league. Moustakas hit a career-high 38 home runs and 85 RBI last season with a .272 average and .835 OPS. 2B Whit Merrifield had an unexpectedly productive year, hitting 19 home runs and stealing 34 bases with a .288 average. OF Alex Gordon had one of the worst seasons of his career, hitting .208 with 9 home runs, and C Salvador Perez added 27 homers with a .268 average in 129 games. Bonifacio hit .255 with 17 home runs in 113 games. Jay hit .296 with the Cubs and Duda hit 30 home runs with the Mets and Rays but hit just .217.

The pitchers posted a 4.61 ERA,which was in the bottom half of the league, as were their 1,216 strikeouts. The bullpen’s 39 saves matched the league average. SP Danny Duffy was the best in the rotation with a 3.81 ERA and 130 strikeouts over 146.1 innings over 24 starts. SP Ian Kennedy posted a 5.38 ERA with 131 strikeouts in 154 innings, and SP Jason Hammel had a 5.29 ERA in 32 starts with 145 strikeouts in 180.1 innings. Hahn posted a 5.30 ERA with 55 strikeouts in 69.2 innings with the A’s. RP Kelvin Herrera recorded 26 saves in 64 appearances, posting a 4.25 ERA with 56 saves in 59.1 innings.

Re-signing Moustakas is a big move for the Royals because losing him would have put a big hole in the middle of their lineup, especially with Hosmer also gone. The 38 home runs that he hit last season, however, were 16 more than he ever had in a season before so you would expect a drop in his power numbers. Gordon, on the other hand, had such a bad season by his standards that he should be able to bounce back this year. With Bonifacio now out for half of the year, OF Jorge Soler, who hit .144 last year, needs to step up and make up for some of that lost offense. The pitching staff lacks a true No. 1 starter, with Duffy currently pegged for that role, and will have a hard time keeping the team in games. Hahn will miss the first two months of the season, but it could be significantly longer than that. But SP Nathan Karns, who had an injury-shortened season last year could be healthy for the start of the season, or close to it, as he has been pitching in spring training.

In a tough division with two teams that made the playoffs last season, including the 102-win Indians, it’ll be tough for the Royals to find much traction in the AL Central this season. I think they may actually fall back to fourth place this year after the White Sox got better this winter. It’s looking like another season without a postseason appearance for the Royals.

Be sure to check back every day around 12pm Eastern for another team preview, see them all here, and follow me on Twitter for a link to each new post when it’s posted.

Source: http://www.royals.comhttp://www.baseball-reference.com

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4th Annual 30 in 30ish MLB Previews: Detroit Tigers

The next AL Central team in our monthlong series previewing all 30 MLB teams leading up to the start of the 2018 season is the Detroit Tigers, who finished in last place in the division last season.

At 64-98, the Tigers are coming off their worst season since 2003 and for the first time since 2004, they’ll play an entire season without ace SP Justin Verlander, who they traded to the Astros in August. And with the three players they got in return not major league-ready yet, the Tigers are probably looking at a few more seasons before they’re competitive again. Their notable signings this offseason were OF Leonys Martin, SP Mike Fiers and P Francisco Liriano. On the other side of the spectrum, they traded 2B Ian Kinsler to the Angels in exchange for a couple of minor leaguers. Among the notable returning players are 1B Miguel Cabrera, SS Jose Iglesias, OF Nicholas Castellanos and SPs Michael Fulmer and Jordan Zimmermann.

The Tigers hit .258 last season, which put them in the top half of Major League Baseball, but their 187 home runs were in the bottom half of the league and their .748 OPS was near the middle of the pack. Castellanos was among the team’s best hitters with a .272 average, 26 home runs, 101 RBI and an .811 OPS. Cabrera had one of the worst seasons of his career, hitting .249 with 16 home runs in 130 games, and DH Victor Martinez also continued his downward trend with a .255 average and just 10 homers in 107 games. Iglesias hit .255 with 6 home runs in 130 games, and C James McCann added 13 home runs on a .253 average. OF Mikie Mahtook hit .276 with 12 dingers. With the Cubs and Mariners last season, Martin hit a paltry .172 with 3 home runs in just 49 games.

The pitchers posted a MLB-worst 5.36 ERA — and that was with having Verlander for all but the last month of the season — and were tied for the fourth-fewest strikeouts with 1,202. Unsurprisingly, with just 64 wins, the team’s 32 saves were tied for the third-fewest in the league. In 25 starts, Fulmer posted a 3.83 ERA with 114 strikeouts in 164.2 innings — and what worse for the rest of the rotation. Zimmermann posted a 6.08 ERA in 29 starts in which he struck out 103 batters in 160 innings. SP Matt Boyd posted a 5.27 ERA with 110 strikeouts in 135 innings. With the Astros, Fiers put up a 5.22 ERA in 29 games, including 28 starts, while striking out 146 batters in 153.1 innings. RP Shane Greene — who took over the closer’s job in August after the team traded RP Justin Wilson — ended up with 9 saves and a 2.66 ERA with 73 strikeouts in 67.2 innings over 71 games.

The trades the Tigers have made since July have been an indication that they are in the midst of a rebuilding process so fans shouldn’t expect much of an improvement over last year. This season should give them an idea of what their future offense may look like with young players like 2B Dixon Machado and 3B Jeimer Candelario expected to make the major-league roster out of spring training and get the starting jobs at their positions. The rotation, on the other hand, is made up of largely mediocre veterans without much upside at this point in their careers, with the exception of Fulmer and, to a lesser extent, Boyd, but they need to take their games to the next level if they want to help get the team out of the basement in the AL Central.

With the Indians and the Twins the best squads in the division, and the White Sox expected to be better this season, it won’t be easy for the Tigers to get many more than 64 wins they earned last season, so they’re likely going to experience their third last-place finish in the last four seasons, but there could be some promising signs for the team if the youngsters show some promising signs.

Be sure to check back every day around 12pm Eastern for another team preview, see them all here, and follow me on Twitter for a link to each new post when it’s posted.

Source: http://www.tigers.comhttp://www.baseball-reference.com

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4th Annual 30 in 30ish MLB Previews: Cleveland Indians

The next AL Central team in our monthlong series previewing all 30 MLB teams leading up to the start of the 2018 season is the Cleveland Indians, who won the division last season.

The Indians won an American League-best 102 games last season, including a 22-game winning streak, but fell to the Yankees in the ALDS and couldn’t return to the World Series for a second straight year. Having won that many games, the Indians didn’t feel the need to add to the team and they enter 2018 with largely the same roster intact. They did sign 1B Yonder Alonso and lost OF Jay Bruce and RP Joe Smith, among others, in free agency. OF Michael Brantley, who has played just 101 games total over the last two seasons, is not expected to be ready for Opening Day. 2B Jason Kipnis, who also dealt with injuries last season, could be on-track to start the season on time. Reigning American League Cy Young winner SP Corey Kluber returns to lead the rotation with another strong season.

The team’s .263 average was the fifth-highest in Major League Baseball last season, but their 212 home runs were near the middle-of-the-pack. They had a .788 OPS, which was second in the majors. DH Edwin Encarnacion led the team with 38 home runs and 107 RBI to go along with his .258 average and .881 OPS. 3B Jose Ramirez hit .318 with 29 home runs and a .957 OPS, and SS Francisco Lindor added another 33 home runs on a .273 average. Kipnis and Brantley each played 90 games, with the former hitting .232 and 12 home runs and the latter putting up a .299 average with 9 homers. C Yan Gomes hit 14 home runs in 105 games. With the A’s and Mariners, Alonso hit .266 with 28 home runs in 142 games.

The Indians led the majors with a 3.30 ERA and 1,614 strikeouts, but their 37 saves were in the bottom half of the league. Kluber was 18-4 with a 2.25 ERA and 265 strikeouts in 203.2 innings over 29 starts. He led the majors in wins and ERA, as well as with a 0.869 WHIP and an 8 WAR, which was best among all pitchers. SP Carlos Carrasco also won 18 games en route to posting a 3.29 ERA in 32 starts; he struck out  226 batters in 200 innings. SP MIke Clevinger posted a 3.11 ERA with 137 strikeouts in 121.2 innings, and SP Trevor Bauer put up a 4.19 ERA with 196 strikeouts in 176.1 innings. SP Danny Salazar appeared in 23 games — 19 starts — and had a 4.28 ERA, striking out 145 in 103 innings. RP Cody Allen recorded 30 of the team’s saves while posting a 2.94 ERA and striking out 92 guys in 67.1 innings over 69 games.

The Indians largely stayed pat this winter and their biggest concern in 2018 should be injuries. If they can get close to a full season out of guys like Kipnis and Brantley, that will help them on their path to a repeat 100-win season. Alonso should be a bit of an upgrade over Carlos Santana, who played first for the Indians last season. Beyond Kluber and Carrasco, there are question marks in the team’s rotation with Bauer and Tomlin showing inconsistency through their careers and Salazar dealing with shoulder inflammation that will keep him sidelined at the start of the regular season. I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Indians trade for another starter during the season because I don’t think the rotation as it stands is good enough if the Indians have hopes of making a deeper playoff run than last season.

The Indians are still the best team in the Central, but the Twins got better this offseason and will pose a bigger threat to the Indians this season. The Indians are still the better team so, while I don’t think they’ll win 100 games again, they should still get the division title again this season, then who they face will determine how far they get into the postseason. They’re still among the top teams in the AL, but some of their competition got better so the road to the World Series won’t be easy.

Be sure to check back every day around 12pm Eastern for another team preview, see them all here, and follow me on Twitter for a link to each new post when it’s posted.

Source: http://www.indians.comhttp://www.baseball-reference.com

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4th Annual 30 in 30ish MLB Previews: Philadelphia Phillies

Continuing with our previews of all 30 MLB teams, leading up to the start of the 2018 season, it is the Philadelphia Phillies, who finished in last place in the NL East last season.

The Phillies won just 66 last season, five fewer than the year before, but they have a young core with their team that has upside, including 3B Maikel Franco and OF Rhys Hoskins. They traded SS Freddy Galvis to the Padres in December to open up a spot for prospect J.P. Crawford. The Phillies also signed some veterans this winter, including 1B Carlos Santana and RP Pat Neshek, who they traded to the Rockies at last year’s trade deadline. They have some good young starting pitchers, including Vince Velasquez, who has 200-strikeout potential if he can make it through a season without an extended stay on the disabled list.

The offense hit .250 last season, which put the Phillies below the MLB average in the category, and their 174 home runs were the fifth-fewest in the majors. They were similarly low in most of the offensive categories. Franco was the team’s top power hitter with 24 home runs and 76 RBI, but he hit just .230 with a .690 OPS. 2B Cesar Hernandez hit .294 with 9 home runs and OF Aaron Altherr launched 19 homers and 65 RBI with a .272 average and .856 OPS. Hoskins played in just 50 games in the majors last season, but he hit 18 home runs and had 48 RBI in that limited time in the big leagues, showing he has power. With the Indians, Santana hit .259 with 23 home runs and 79 RBI.

The pitching staff was in the bottom half of the majors with a 4.55 ERA and 1,309 strikeouts. They recorded 33 saves, which was tied for the fifth-fewest in MLB. SP Aaron Nola led the starters with a 3.54 ERA and he struck out 184 batters in 168 innings over 27 starts. Velasquez was limited to 72 innings over 15 starts, but racked up 68 strikeouts in those games. He posted a 5.13 ERA, which was better than SP Nick Pivetta, who recorded a 6.02 ERA in 26 starts. Pivetta had 140 strikeouts in 133 innings. Young SPs Jerad Eickhoff and Ben Lively showed some promising signs but with room for improvement, as both posted ERAs above 4.25. RP Hector Neris handled the bulk of the closing duties, nailing down 26 saves with a 3.01 ERA and 86 strikeouts in 74 appearances, totaling 74.2 innings. In the 43 games he played for the Phillies, Neshek threw 40.1 innings with a 1.12 ERA and 45 strikeouts.

Looking ahead, the young core should improve this season as they get more experience against big-league pitching and guys like Hoskins get their first full season in the majors. Crawford could be a key to the Phillies scoring more runs if he can live up to expectations that have been set for him playing in the middle of the infield. Santana adds power to the lineup. The Phillies should also get some decent offensive production out of the catcher position, with Jorge Alfaro and Cameron Rupp expected to split the time behind the plate. If Velasquez can stay healthy this season — he’s never made more than 24 starts in a season — he would form a formidable top of the rotation with Nola, and Eickhoff has the potential to be a strong No. 2 or No. 3 in the rotation if he can return to his 2016 form, when his ERA was more than a run lower than it was last season. If things all come together for the pitchers, the Phillies could approach a .500 record, which they haven’t done since 2012.

The NL East has teams that are clearly better or worse than the rest of the division, with the Nationals the likely division winner and the Marlins expected to finish in the basement. The Phillies will probably finish third in the division this year, which would be an improvement over last year’s last-place finish, but if the Mets deal with injuries again this season, the Phillies could end up being the second-best team in the division.

Be sure to check back every day around 12pm Eastern for another team preview, see them all here, and follow me on Twitter for a link to each new post when it’s posted.

Sources: http://www.phillies.com, http://www.baseball-reference.com

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4th Annual 30 in 30ish MLB Previews: New York Mets

Up next in our preview of all 30 MLB teams, leading up to the start of the 2018 season, are the New York Metswho finished in fourth place in the NL East last season

Injuries prevented the Mets from living up to expectations last season and led to a 70-92 season, tying their worst record since 2009 and marking a 17-win drop from 2016. If the players can stay healthy — especially the pitchers — they should be competitive in the NL East again this season. The Mets’ biggest addition this offseason was 3B Todd Frazier, signing the free agent to a two-year contract to take over at the position with uncertainty about the future of longtime Met David Wright. The Mets also signed 1B Adrian Gonzalez and OF Jay Bruce — who they traded to the Indians at last year’s trade deadline — on offense along with pitchers Anthony Swarzak and Jason Vargas. Swarzak should end up in the bullpen, with Vargas likely sliding into the rotation, which already includes SPs Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard, Steven Matz and — when healthy — Matt Harvey. Gone this year are 1B Lucas Duda, 2B Neil Walker and RP Addison Reed.

The Mets were slightly below the MLB average last season with a .250 team batting average, but their 224 home runs put them in the top 10. Their .755 OPS was in the top half of the majors. Individually, OF Yoenis Cespedes led the team with a .292 average and .892 OPS to go along with 17 home runs and 42 RBI in just 81 games. Bruce led the team with 29 home runs and 75 RBI in 103 games before the Mets sent him to Cleveland around the trade deadline. In 145 games, SS Jose Reyes hit .246 with 15 home runs and 24 steals. 3B Wilmer Flores added 18 home runs in 110 games. In Frazier, the Mets are getting a player who hit just .213 with the White Sox and Yankees last season but totaled 27 homers and 76 RBI. Gonzalez played 71 games for the Dodgers, hitting .242 with 3 home runs and 30 RBI.

The pitching staff posted a 5.01 ERA, which was the third-worst in the majors, but 1,374 strikeouts placed the staff in the top 10. The Mets were in the bottom third of the league with 34 saves. In the rotation, deGrom made 31 starts — the only Met to surpass 30 starts last season– with a 3.53 ERA and 239 strikeouts in 201.1 record on the way to a 15-10 record, solidifying him as the team’s ace. SP Robert Gsellman had the next most starts on the squad with 22, and 25 total appearances, but pitched to a disappointing 5.19 ERA with 82 strikeouts in 119.2 innings. In 19 games, 18 starts, Harvey had a 6.70 ERA and struck out 67 batters in 92.2 innings. Matz was limited to 13 games last season that amounted to a 6.08 ERA, and Syndergaard started just seven times, with a 2.97 ERA. With the Royals last year, Vargas made 32 starts and had a 4.16 ERA with 134 strikeouts in 179.2 innings. Reed led the team with 19 saves last season and RP Jeurys Familia had 6 saves. He had just 26 appearances, limited by a suspension and shoulder injury, 4.38 ERA and 25 strikeouts in 24.2 innings.

The Mets need more out of their starting staff, and a repeat performance from deGrom, this season. Health will, of course, be important for that. Harvey and Syndergaard are expected to be healthy entering the season. Harvey needs to pitch much better than last season, as an ERA north of 6 won’t cut it, but if Syndergaard can continue to pitch the way he did in limited action in 2016, he will form a formidable 1-2 at the top of the rotation along with deGrom. Having guys like Gsellman and P Seth Lugo give the Mets pitching depth in case some of their anticipated starters continue to deal with injuries and/or poor performance in 2018. On offense, adding Frazier won’t help the Mets’ batting average, but should add more pop to the lineup behind Cespedes. Other than Frazier, the Mets aren’t likely to get much production from the infield that includes Gonzalez, 2B Asdrubal Cabrera and SS Amed Rosario, with Reyes expected to serve as backup utility role.

The Mets probably would have been around the .500 mark if they didn’t have as many injuries as they did, and I’m targeting them to be around there again this season. The offense leaves something to be desired, but if the starting rotation can stay healthy and perform close to what they can do, they should pitch well enough to keep the Mets in games. I think the Mets could be in a competition with the improved Phillies for second place in the East, behind the Nationals, who are still the best of the bunch in the division.

Be sure to check back every day around 12pm Eastern for another team preview, see them all here, and follow me on Twitter for a link to each new post when it’s posted.

Sources: http://www.mets.com, http://www.baseball-reference.com

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MLB Hot Stove: Brewers add to the outfield, Hall of Fame announces ’18 class

The slow offseason news cycle picked up a bit this week, starting with the announcement of the 2018 Hall of Fame class on Wednesday. But the bigger news as it relates to on-field moves came on Thursday, when the Brewers added to the outfield via a trade and the biggest free-agent signing to this point of the hot stove season.

The trade was announced first, with the Brewers acquiring OF Christian Yelich from the Marlins — who continue to trade their stars as they begin what looks to be a lengthy rebuilding process — in exchange for a package of four prospects led by OF Lewis Brinson. Also going to Miami in the deal are OF Monte Harrison, IF Isan Diaz and P Jordan Yamamoto. Shortly after that trade was announced, the Brewers announced the signing of OF Lorenzo Cain to a five-year, $80 million contract.

In Yelich, the Brewers get a 26-year-old who is a career .290 hitter in five MLB seasons. He has started to show some power in the last couple of seasons, hitting 21 home runs in 2016 and 18 homers last season. He’s also had double-digit steals in four of his five seasons and has steadily increased his walk totals over the last three seasons. Yelich was expected to be traded by the Marlins after he and his agent have publicly shown his displeasure for the Marlins’ trading teammates Giancarlo Stanton, Dee Gordon and Marcell Ozuna earlier in the offseason. Yelich is under team control through 2021, with a team option for the 2022 season.

Cain is the first player this offseason to sign a contract of longer than three years. Signing with the Brewers is a homecoming for the former All-Star, who was drafted by the Brewers and played his rookie season there before being traded to the Royals in December 2010. He spent the last seven season with the Royals, with whom he was part of the team that won the 2015 World Series. He is also a .290 career hitter but doesn’t have much power, hitting a total of 57 home runs in his eight seasons. He does have speed, though, averaging nearly 16 steals per season, with 26 last season. He made the American League All-Star team in 2015, when his career year — .307 average, 16 HR, 72 RBI, 28 steals — helped him finish in third place in AL MVP voting.

With these additions, the Brewers’ regular outfield will likely consist of Yelich in right field, Cain in center and Ryan Braun in left field. The acquisitions also give the Brewers depth in the outfield, allowing them to potentially use someone like Domingo Santana or Brett Phillips as trade bait to try to add to the starting rotation, which is the weak spot on the team as it stands. The Brewers were already an 86-win team in 2017 and finished just a game out of the playoffs and look to improve upon that record with these moves, which give them a bump on offense.

Other deals that have been made in the last couple weeks include the Blue Jays trading a couple minor league pitchers to the Cardinals for OF Randal Grichuk and signing OF Curtis Granderson, the Cubs signing P Brian Duensing, the Giants inking OF Austin Jackson and the Mets re-signing SS Jose Reyes. That leaves names like pitchers Yu Darvish and Jake Arrieta, along with hitters such as J.D. Martinez, Mike Moustakas and Eric Hosmer remaining in free agency.

The other big news of the week was the announcement of the 2018 Hall of Fame class. The BBWAA voters elected four members to the Hall — 3B Chipper Jones, 1B/DH Jim Thome, OF Vladimir Guerrero and RP Trevor Hoffman. They join P Jack Morris and SS Alan Trammell, who were elected to the Hall of Fame by the Modern Baseball Committee in December. Jones and Thome were in their first year of eligibility on the ballot, while Guerrero was in his second year and Hoffman his third.

Jones spent his entire 19-year career with the Braves, finishing his career with a .303 average, 468 home runs and 1,623 RBI. He was an eight-time All-Star and a member of the Braves team that won the 1995 World Series. He was named the National League MVP in 1999. He earned 97.2% of the vote.

Thome spent 13 of his 22 seasons with the Indians. He played more than 2500 games in his career, swatting 612 home runs to go along with a .276 career average and 1,699 RBI. He was a five-time All-Star who finished fourth in NL MVP voting in 2003 (with the Phillies). He earned 89.8% of the vote.

Guerrero played 16 seasons, spending the majority of his career with the Expos (eight seasons) and Angels (six seasons). He hit .318 in his career with 449 home runs and 1,496 RBI. He was elected to nine All-Star teams and won the AL MVP in 2004, his first season with the Angels. He earned 92.9% of the vote, a significant jump from the 71.7% he got his first time on the ballot in 2017. He has announced that he will go into the Hall of Fame as an Angel, becoming the first inductee to represent that team in the Hall.

Hoffman spent 16 of his 18 seasons on the Padres, amassing a then-record 601 saves by the time he retired in 2010. In 1,035 appearances, he threw 1,089.1 innings, with a 2.87 ERA and 1,133 strikeouts with a 61-75 record. He was named to seven All-Star teams and finished in the top 10 in NL MVP voting in 1998 and 2006. He earned 79.9% of the vote.

Just missing election was DH Edgar Martinez, who got 70.4% of the vote, falling a few votes shy of the 75% needed. That means he likely has a good chance to get elected next year in what will be his 10th and final year on the BBWAA ballot. Also on next year’s ballot will be a list of first-timers that includes RP Mariano Rivera (who surpassed Hoffman’s saves record), 1B/OF Lance Berkman, 1B Todd Helton, OF Juan Pierre, and SPs Andy Pettitte, Roy Oswalt and the late Roy Halladay.